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Home > Sabbat Supplies + Gifts > Imbolc Supplies + Gifts > Foxglove - Digitalis Purpurea Organic Seeds
Foxglove - Digitalis Purpurea Organic Seeds

Foxglove - Digitalis Purpurea Organic Seeds


HH-FOXGL
$3.95
Qty:
These are standard form foxgloves. Historically, seeds making their way to the west coast of the US in ship balast found a likely niche in the acid soils of the maritime forests and sea bluffs, where currently the summer display of these beauties is a sight to behold.

Etymology: There have been many suggestions for the derivation of the name "foxglove". According to the 19th century book, English Botany, Or, Coloured Figures of British Plants:

Dr. Prior, whose authority is great in the origin of popular names, says "It seems probably that the name was in the first place, foxes' glew, or music, in reference to the favorite instrument of an earlier time, a ring of bells hung on an arched support, the tintinnabulum"... we cannot quite agree with Dr. Prior for it seems quite probable that the shape of the flowers suggested the idea of a glove, and that associated with the name of the botanist Fuchs, who first gave it a botanical name, may have been easily corrupted into foxglove. It happens, moreover, the name foxglove is a very ancient one and exists in a list of plants as old as the time of Edward III. The "folks" of our ancestors were the fairies and nothing is more likely than that the pretty colored bells of the plant would be designated "folksgloves," afterwards, "foxglove." In Wales it is declared to be a favorite lurking-place of the fairies, who are said to occasion a snapping sound when children, holding one end of the digitalis bell, suddenly strike the other on the hand to hear the clap of fairy thunder, with which the indignant fairy makes her escape from her injured retreat. In south of Scotland it is called "bloody fingers" more northward, "dead man's bells" whilst in Wales it is known as "fairy-folks-fingers" or "lambs-tongue-leaves" --Wikipedia

Toxicity: The entire plant is toxic (including the roots and seeds), although the leaves of the upper stem are particularly potent, with just a very slight amount or nibble being enough to potentially cause death. Early symptoms of ingestion include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hallucinations, delirium, and severe headache.

There have been instances of people confusing digitalis with the relatively harmless Symphytum (comfrey) plant (which is often brewed into a tea) with fatal consequences. Other fatal accidents involve children drinking the water in a vase containing digitalis plants. Drying does not reduce the toxicity of the plant. The plant is toxic to animals including all classes of livestock and poultry, as well as felines and canines.

Cultivation Notes: Digitalis thrives in acidic soils, in partial sunlight to deep shade, in a range of habitats including open woods, woodland clearings, moorland, and heath margins, sea-cliffs, rocky mountain slopes and hedge banks. It is commonly found on sites where the ground has been disturbed, such as recently cleared woodland, or where the vegetation has been burnt.

Of course, Foxglove is a low dose botanical that should not be taken internally without proper preparation and always at low dosage.

Organically Certified 300 seeds/pkt.


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